5G: The Next Generation of Mobile Technology

5G: The Next Generation of Mobile Technology

The next generation of wireless service for mobile technology is (almost) here.

Take a look at the top corner of your smartphone screen. Currently, it probably reads 4G LTE. This indicates the fourth generation of data technology for cellular networks (following 3g for the third generation). LTE, aka Long Term Evolution, refers to the technical process for phones to receive high-speed data.

But years from now, your screen may read 5G instead.

The mobile industry is hyped about the next generation of high-speed wireless service. But the shift to 5G is not one that will happen quickly.

Major carriers around the world must upgrade their massive infrastructures. But the 5G revolution will also apply to technology far beyond mobile devices. It’s being built to connect to VR headsets, drones, self-driving cars, and billions of other interconnected devices.

The Basics of 5G for Mobile Technology

In a nutshell, 5G is a faster version of 4G. With wider pipelines and faster lanes, 5G may offer speeds about ten times faster than 4G LTE.

This means you’ll be able to download movies in seconds and even stream a live VR experience from across the world without lag. With 5G, 10Gbps will be very possible.

Imagine the possibilities of network communications with low latency – drones, autonomous cars, and other interconnected devices can instantly communicate with wireless signals in life-or-death situations.

5G may even replace WiFi networks at homes or businesses with its benefits of faster speeds and better coverage.

When Should We Expect 5G?

2020 is the targeted launch date for US carriers. Although it seems like a long wait, it’s quite an ambitious deployment timeline. 5G will bring new devices and applications for wireless data.

“Where you saw a growth in 4G was around data-centric, smartphone-centric use cases,” says Intel’s general manager for 5G business Rob Topol. “We’re looking beyond the smartphone for 5G.” In particular, that means categories like automotive, virtual reality, drones, and more should reap its benefits first.

“Where you saw a growth in 4G was around data-centric, smartphone-centric use cases,” says Intel’s general manager for 5G business Rob Topol. “We’re looking beyond the smartphone for 5G.” In particular, that means categories like automotive, virtual reality, drones, and more should reap its benefits first.